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  • July 23, 2014 1:31 pm
    <3
chimneyfish:

Molly Crabapple
Ellen Rogers
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    <3

    chimneyfish:

    Molly Crabapple

    Ellen Rogers

  • July 22, 2014 2:05 pm
  • July 14, 2014 6:05 pm
  • July 14, 2014 10:56 am

    “The artist was not present for the weeklong dismantling of her giant Baby and declined to be interviewed. Concerned about the emotions she’d suffer, her staff packed her off to a house in the woods. But rather than mourn the departure of her creation, Ms. Walker ought to take heart from her contribution to the grand tradition of ephemeral art. From Michelangelo to the Buddhist monks who make — and destroy — sand mandalas, artists have always been intrigued by impermanence.”

    Rather than mourn the dismantling of Kara Walker’s marvelous installation, Blake Gopnik wants us to celebrate as part of the long history of ephemeral artworks, a history that includes Michelangelo and Buddhist monks. READ MORE.

  • July 9, 2014 3:15 pm

    “What we have here is a key contradiction of our economic system: on the one hand, we have empty buildings punctuating the city’s landscape, and on the other, we have droves of families who are day by day becoming homeless in spite of their best efforts to stay afloat.”

    Creative Time Reports spoke with City Life/Vida Urbana, the Boston collective who set up a pirate radio station to combat foreclosures. Read it.

  • July 8, 2014 12:02 pm

    Kara Walker’s “A Subtlety” by the numbers:
    130,554 visitors
    24,164 #KaraWalkerDomino Instagrams
    7,855 posters sold
    210 volunteers employed
    6 features in the The New York Times
    1 Visit from Beyoncé

  • June 26, 2014 4:16 pm

    Fab photos from last week’s We Are Here event. More on their Tumblr here: http://weareherekwe.tumblr.com/

  • June 25, 2014 2:19 pm

    “I didn’t want a completely passive viewer. Art means too much to me. To be able to articulate something visually is really an important thing. I wanted to make work where the viewer wouldn’t walk away; he would either giggle nervously, get pulled into history, into fiction, into something totally demeaning and possibly very beautiful. I wanted to create something that looks like you. It looks like a cartoon character, it’s a shadow, it’s a piece of paper, but it’s out of scale. It refers to your shadow, to some extent to purity, to the mirror.” —Kara Walker

    Thanks to Sikkema Jenkins for the mini retrospective of Kara’s career! An excellent reminder of all the incredible work that has led up to her Domino installation, and all the exciting work she will create in the future.

  • June 20, 2014 2:25 pm
    blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: I shot this picture of the head of Kara Walker’s “sphinx” at the abandoned Domino  factory in Brooklyn, while its body was still headless and its Styrofoam had yet to be sugar-coated. (Read all about the project in my feature in yesterday’s New York “Times”.)  An image of a fragmented work begs for a fragmented  text, so here are some bits from my Walker interviews that I didn’t find a place for in the “Times”.
– During her years in high school in Atlanta, Kara said she was expected to choose sides between blacks and whites, but instead chose to mix with a “New Wave-y, punkish” crowd of “dorks” that was “on the queerer end of the spectrum – and there was no table for that in the lunchroom.” Whatever our sexual preferences, many of us who haven’t fit into the mainstream have found a kind of refuge in the “otherness” that queer culture offers, despite the risks of associating with it.
– Kara cited a couple of interesting influences. When she was 11 or 12, she said, the family went to a Warhol show that impressed her:  “I just remember my dad was sort of dismissive, he was like ‘Oh, he’s kind of a weird guy’, or something like that. And the combination of my dad not being all gung-ho about this very deadpan work, and the deadpan-ness of it, was kind of affecting.” She cited a more transformative moment that came as an undergrad in art school. On a trip to Washington, she saw the work of Mike Kelley, the California conceptualist who counted everything from sock monkeys to his high school as art. “It was just so deep, it was so dark, so funny, and it seemed not to answer to anybody,” she said. That strikes me as a decent description of what Kara  herself went on to do.
– She poke of her days as an undergrad, and her vexed relationship with standard notions of racial identity: “The first time I made an image that had a recognizable black figure in it, everybody just went gaga. And I thought ‘Well, that was weird.’ And it was one of those things where my black colleagues at [art] school said, “So, you are with us.’ My colleagues at school and profs were, like, ‘See, now you understand yourself. Now we see who you really are.’ And I kind of got interested in that tension.”
– And she spoke of being confronted with the challenge of the Domino space: “Before I settled on an icon, if felt overwhelming. It felt like there’s this huge space, and this huge opportunity – am I up for it?  And I felt again that tug between hubris and deep insecurity, bordering on suicide – and I chose the former, I guess, the hubristic…. It’s funny, because [now] I walk into the space and I think, ‘[The sphinx] is still really small; it’s not big enough.’ “
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.
View high resolution

    blakegopnik:

    THE DAILY PIC: I shot this picture of the head of Kara Walker’s “sphinx” at the abandoned Domino  factory in Brooklyn, while its body was still headless and its Styrofoam had yet to be sugar-coated. (Read all about the project in my feature in yesterday’s New York “Times”.)  An image of a fragmented work begs for a fragmented  text, so here are some bits from my Walker interviews that I didn’t find a place for in the “Times”.

    – During her years in high school in Atlanta, Kara said she was expected to choose sides between blacks and whites, but instead chose to mix with a “New Wave-y, punkish” crowd of “dorks” that was “on the queerer end of the spectrum – and there was no table for that in the lunchroom.” Whatever our sexual preferences, many of us who haven’t fit into the mainstream have found a kind of refuge in the “otherness” that queer culture offers, despite the risks of associating with it.

    – Kara cited a couple of interesting influences. When she was 11 or 12, she said, the family went to a Warhol show that impressed her:  “I just remember my dad was sort of dismissive, he was like ‘Oh, he’s kind of a weird guy’, or something like that. And the combination of my dad not being all gung-ho about this very deadpan work, and the deadpan-ness of it, was kind of affecting.” She cited a more transformative moment that came as an undergrad in art school. On a trip to Washington, she saw the work of Mike Kelley, the California conceptualist who counted everything from sock monkeys to his high school as art. “It was just so deep, it was so dark, so funny, and it seemed not to answer to anybody,” she said. That strikes me as a decent description of what Kara  herself went on to do.

    – She poke of her days as an undergrad, and her vexed relationship with standard notions of racial identity: “The first time I made an image that had a recognizable black figure in it, everybody just went gaga. And I thought ‘Well, that was weird.’ And it was one of those things where my black colleagues at [art] school said, “So, you are with us.’ My colleagues at school and profs were, like, ‘See, now you understand yourself. Now we see who you really are.’ And I kind of got interested in that tension.”

    – And she spoke of being confronted with the challenge of the Domino space: “Before I settled on an icon, if felt overwhelming. It felt like there’s this huge space, and this huge opportunity – am I up for it?  And I felt again that tug between hubris and deep insecurity, bordering on suicide – and I chose the former, I guess, the hubristic…. It’s funny, because [now] I walk into the space and I think, ‘[The sphinx] is still really small; it’s not big enough.’ “

    The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

  • June 20, 2014 2:23 pm
  • June 20, 2014 2:22 pm
    penamerican:

Read Hatian author Jean-Euphèle Milcé’s piece for Creative Time’s series of pieces related to Kara Walker’s “A Subtlety…” installation, then come see him this Sunday at the Queens Museum at 5PM. "A cane laborer needs a hiding place. You have to outsmart this produce that grows while slicing through your skin with each wind gust. The furrows I wear on my body are like ramps onto the road of the sugar of sweetness and the rum of intoxication leading toward New York, London, Milan."http://creativetimereports.org/2014/05/09/jean-euphele-milce-to-drink-my-sweet-body/
View high resolution

    penamerican:

    Read Hatian author Jean-Euphèle Milcé’s piece for Creative Time’s series of pieces related to Kara Walker’s “A Subtlety…” installation, then come see him this Sunday at the Queens Museum at 5PM.

    "A cane laborer needs a hiding place. You have to outsmart this produce that grows while slicing through your skin with each wind gust. The furrows I wear on my body are like ramps onto the road of the sugar of sweetness and the rum of intoxication leading toward New York, London, Milan."

    http://creativetimereports.org/2014/05/09/jean-euphele-milce-to-drink-my-sweet-body/

  • June 19, 2014 4:19 pm

    As part of the creative process leading up to her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory, Kara Walker did extensive research on the sugar trade. Explore her notes, sketches, bibliography, and more HERE.

  • June 17, 2014 1:48 pm

    “Today 780 million people lack access to drinking water. By 2030 nearly half the world’s population will inhabit areas of ‘high water stress.’ In Central Asia the lack of the precious resource not only traps people in situations of dire need and sanitary hazard; it also foreshadows the rise of “water wars”—cross-border skirmishes over access to water that aggravate ecological strife and give it sharp political overtones.”

    Fyodor Savintsev’s photos of Kyrgyzstan foreshadow water conflicts to come in Central Asia. SEE MORE.

  • June 16, 2014 11:19 am

    Just another weekend celeb spotting at the Domino Sugar Factory! On Sunday, Beyoncé, Jay Z, Blue Ivy, Alicia Keys, Swizz Beatz & kids met Kara Walker at the exhibition. Who knows who will stop by next?